Trees

Jackson Pollock & Patagonia

Man often strives to reproduce the beauty of nature in paint and sometimes nature reproduces a man’s painting. To achieve an image of “harmonious chaos” Jackson Pollock moved constantly around his huge canvas dripping paint. This movement wasn’t random and Pollock said that with each, usually abrupt, movement he remained in contact with his work. As I took shelter from the icy Patagonian wind in a wood in Puerto Natales I looked up and saw how the wind moved these branches in sometimes abrupt but fluid movements and the snow fell from above like Pollock’s dripping paint.

A menudo el hombre reproduce con pintura la belleza de la naturaleza y veces la naturaleza reproduce las obras del hombre. Para conseguir una imagen de “caos con harmonía” Jackson Pollock se movía constantemente por sus grandes lienzos goteando pintura. Estos movimientos no eran azarosos y el propio Pollock decía que con cada movimiento, normalmente brusco, se mantenía en contacto con la obra. Mientras me resguardaba en un bosque de Puerto Natales del viento miré arriba y vi como el aire movía brusca pero fluidamente las ramas del árbol a las que caía la nieve desde arriba como chorreaba la pintura de Pollock.

Mural sobre vermella

Trees Mono

pollock

This entry was published on December 5, 2012 at 7:20 pm. It’s filed under All previous posts / Todos los posts anteriores, Art / Arte, Nature / Naturaleza, Painting / Pintura, Photos / Fotos and tagged . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

One thought on “Jackson Pollock & Patagonia

  1. Chris
    I really like the juxtaposition of Pollock and the photographed ‘actual’ world. Clever of you to see it and to capture it. I love Pollock, not least for the process that his paintings communicate – the energy and rhythms of his ‘action’ painting. For those who don’t like him, who consider his ‘colourful messes’ to be meaningless doodles could have an ‘aha’ moment if they saw your blog. Me included. I have never seen his works as ‘representational’ of a concrete world. Good stuff. Ivan

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: